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Lessons Learned - Feeback from successful PMP's


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#61 O_Canada

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 07:49 PM

okay fellows, I passed my PMP on the first try today!
I will share with you my experience, but please, this is for reference only. Do what you think is best. DO NOT DO what I did. But based on my experience, I can provide certain recommendations:

-->Became PMI member and downloaded PMBOK pdf; great idea because you can perform searches very easily.

--> Bought HeadFirst and Rita

--> Some chapters I read in HeadFirst, others I read in Rita. If I found that Rita was too confusing, I would put the book down and read it from HeadFirstt, then go back to Rita.

I did not even finish reading either of the books. I thought the exam was tomorrow and I still had 4 knowledge areas to cover! Luckily, I called Prometric about something and they said your exam is in a few hours and I said, you got to be kidding me!! By God, the Exam was in a few hours! Now I was panicked.

Anyways, i took 45min, read the risk chapter from Rita and drive to the exam center. I got about 50 min earlier, so I sat in the car and reviewed Rita's end of chapter questions on Risk. With 10 min remaining, I packed up and went up to the Exam center.

I got done in 3hrs. I had marked about 15 questions. I reviewed them and changed only a few. I decided to do a full review, since I had about 45min. Started the full review, but after about 18 questions, decided that is was a futile excerise, since your brain is now tired and more exhausted you could make more mistakes. I hit the End Exam button.
The computer sat there for at least a min with a blank screen, churning away; I thought darn this Microsoft thing, looks like PC is stuck. But no, it was just crunching away, and finally told me that I passed! woohoo.

So, again , do not do what I did.

Recommendation? Buy both books. If you are able to score over 85% in the end of chapter questions in Rita on your first try , you are in good shape.

If a chapter/topic is very new to you, use HeadFirst, then follow it up with Rita.
HeadFirst makes it easy, while Rita is very detailed to the point. I would say use both!

Good luck.



#62 Prabhu Sundaram

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 09:03 PM

QUOTE (ChandraR @ Mar 13 2010, 02:13 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Glad to inform that I passed the PMP exam to day. Here is my LL summary:

Initiated: 5 months back (Oct. 09)

Study Materials: PMP study guide by Joseph Phillips - 1 time

PMBOK 4 - 2 times

Great Forums participated/ followed religiously: PMZILLA.COM; PMHUB.NET; DEEPFRIEDBRAINPMP; OReily Head First PMP. These keep your learning process constant and stimulating with their articles, LL, tips, study material. I am thankful to these sites for their valuable resources that helped more than PMBOK4 and helped me get over the dryness of PMBOK and keep my focus on PMBOK4.

Free Mock up exams took: PMZIlla; PMStudy, Head FirstPMP; Lehmann 175Q; Simplilearn;TechFaq360. After taking 2 of these tests and scoring around 68%, I felt my preparation risky and to mitigate the risk I postponed the exam 1 time for another 3 weeks, went back to PMBOK and took the remaining in the above list and scored around 80% consistently and gave the exam to day and could clear it.

Day b4 exam: Revised ITTO; Went through Jim Owens's pdf files summary of each KA - easy to read and well presented

About exam: Not easy; Not too tough; Not wordy. Could not do as much as I hoped to do but enough to avoid re doing. Math related Qs- simple and straightforward- may be less than 10Qs. About 10Qs marked for revisiting at the end. I expected 25 q's beyond the boundaries of PMBOK4 but found just a couple. Some Qs redundant in nature - asking the same thing but just changing the numerical values-Disadvantage of randomizing? Advantage to us. Free Bees that bail us out!

Successfully closed this project: March 13, 2010

Chandra


Congratulations Chandra. And a big thank you for answering all my questions.

Regards,
Prabhu.


#63 Prabhu Sundaram

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 09:09 PM

Hi,
It's a great joy to share the news of gaining my PMP certification!!!! After four months of toil, finally I was able to see the message "Congratulations!". When people mentioned that the waiting time to see the results was long, I could not understand until when I myself experienced, probably the most thrilling moment of my life!
I felt my paper was a bit tough, wordy. EV calculations and network diagrams are very easy and it's easy to get marks there. But in other areas, there were a lot of twist. I was mentally tired half-way through the exam. I could not focus well on the questions as well. Nevertheless what mattered was the final result. Not sure why, but I kept weeping for sometime, probably tears of joy!
My sincere thanks to this forum for helping me.
For those who want to know how I prepared:

1. Started with Headfirst PMP. I am not sure, if I would got so interested in PMP without this book. It's a gem, I would treat.
2. Watched the video presentations from Cornelius Fichtner. They were very good.
3. In parallel, to these videos, I read the PMBOK guide once.
4. Read the Rita's book once and some chapters twice. These were very helpful as well, especially her process chart and Q & A. People should ignore her negative, harsh comments liberally scattered throughout the book!
5. Again read the PMBOK guide completely once!
6. Took free tests from simplilearn, oliver, Alex Sherrer, headfirst and pmstudy
7. Took a paid test from PMSTUDY
8. Referred to Alex Sherrer's free materials (very well presented in easily understandable manner) and Kim Heldman's study guide and review guide.
9. On the day before, I went through my own materials and ITTOs
10. I did not memorise the ITTOs, but I think I could have got two more questions right because of that. Other questions on ITTO, I am sure I would have got them right, because of my understanding. But I am not sure if it's worth memorizing such a big material of ITTO.

Thanks biggrin.gif again to all the kind souls who have helped me in this.

Thanks,
Prabhu.



#64 ChandraR

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 05:17 AM

Congratulations Prabhu! I have never any slightest doubt about your clearing PMP as I could see your effort and analysis through this forum

Chandra

QUOTE (Prabhu Sundaram @ Apr 21 2010, 09:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi,
It's a great joy to share the news of gaining my PMP certification!!!! After four months of toil, finally I was able to see the message "Congratulations!". When people mentioned that the waiting time to see the results was long, I could not understand until when I myself experienced, probably the most thrilling moment of my life!
I felt my paper was a bit tough, wordy. EV calculations and network diagrams are very easy and it's easy to get marks there. But in other areas, there were a lot of twist. I was mentally tired half-way through the exam. I could not focus well on the questions as well. Nevertheless what mattered was the final result. Not sure why, but I kept weeping for sometime, probably tears of joy!
My sincere thanks to this forum for helping me.
For those who want to know how I prepared:

1. Started with Headfirst PMP. I am not sure, if I would got so interested in PMP without this book. It's a gem, I would treat.
2. Watched the video presentations from Cornelius Fichtner. They were very good.
3. In parallel, to these videos, I read the PMBOK guide once.
4. Read the Rita's book once and some chapters twice. These were very helpful as well, especially her process chart and Q & A. People should ignore her negative, harsh comments liberally scattered throughout the book!
5. Again read the PMBOK guide completely once!
6. Took free tests from simplilearn, oliver, Alex Sherrer, headfirst and pmstudy
7. Took a paid test from PMSTUDY
8. Referred to Alex Sherrer's free materials (very well presented in easily understandable manner) and Kim Heldman's study guide and review guide.
9. On the day before, I went through my own materials and ITTOs
10. I did not memorise the ITTOs, but I think I could have got two more questions right because of that. Other questions on ITTO, I am sure I would have got them right, because of my understanding. But I am not sure if it's worth memorizing such a big material of ITTO.

Thanks biggrin.gif again to all the kind souls who have helped me in this.

Thanks,
Prabhu.



#65 blutooliverxd

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 12:10 PM

QUOTE (hmenon @ Aug 9 2007, 05:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It would be great if certified PMP's could share their experiences in preparing and passing the PMP certification. I am starting this post linking the latest LL's available in this forum. Hopefully new PMP's would either post here or link their LL posts in this post.

Thanks for initiating this topic. It provides me lots of useful information for the PMP exam today. And I passed at the first try.

My lesson learned is:
1. To anyone who is wondering about how to start, just find a Head First PMP book and register for PMI membership to get the PMBok Guide (body of knowledge).
2. The exam is very close to those two books
3. Try the best to study the two books
4. I speak English as a second language. I need at least 2 months fully concentrating on studying the two books
5. Register for the PMP exam and get certified smile.gif.

Note: you need to understand all input, tools & techniques, output. Understand the meaning of each process.

Thanks to the authors of Head First PMP. I am a PMP from Viet Nam smile.gif

#66 mikkelandersen

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 10:08 AM

QUOTE (blutooliverxd @ Sep 29 2010, 12:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks for initiating this topic. It provides me lots of useful information for the PMP exam today. And I passed at the first try.

My lesson learned is:
1. To anyone who is wondering about how to start, just find a Head First PMP book and register for PMI membership to get the PMBok Guide (body of knowledge).
2. The exam is very close to those two books
3. Try the best to study the two books
4. I speak English as a second language. I need at least 2 months fully concentrating on studying the two books
5. Register for the PMP exam and get certified smile.gif.

Note: you need to understand all input, tools & techniques, output. Understand the meaning of each process.

Thanks to the authors of Head First PMP. I am a PMP from Viet Nam smile.gif
,

I think the whole PMP training curriculum can be completed is less than a week, if the Accelerated Learning (AL) techniques are applied. The truth is, people find it difficult to learn and absorb knowledge in distraction loaded environment, hence in a Distraction Free Environment (DFE) the complete opposite can achieved. For example, if you want to learn a new language, the best way to do so is to go to the actual country and get immersed.



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PMP exam

#67 farr

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 10:01 PM

excellent stuff in these forums. my exam date is in mid march 2011, and i have started the preparation, my main source of prep is PMBOK 4th edition, due to my limited finances i cannot afford to get the 300% Rita simulation software for pmp mcqs. can any one suggest another software which is very close to it and withing/about 100$ ?

#68 mikkelandersen

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 04:56 AM

[quote name='mikkelandersen' date='Dec 8 2010, 10:08 AM' post='38630']
,

I think the whole PMP training curriculum can be completed is less than a week, if the Accelerated Learning (AL) techniques are applied. The truth is, people find it difficult to learn and absorb knowledge in distraction loaded environment, hence in a Distraction Free Environment (DFE) the complete opposite can achieved. For example, if you want to learn a new language, the best way to do so is to go to the actual country and get immersed.

But let us not forget that PMP can be a highly tough field to get into.



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PMP course






#69 JoeGO78

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 09:31 PM

I passed the exam today. I got the second edition of this book as a lark because I had used Rtia's and didn't like it.

I really thought this book helped in preparing for the exam moreso than any other resource other than the PMBOK. I read the PMBOK twice, once thoroughly and the second time skimming. After this i still found myself unsure of my preparedness. I got the the Rita book from work, and did not like it at all. It was too wordy, and boring.

I happened upon the head first book on amazon and bought it, it was really great. At fiirst it does seem a little hokey, but that is its charm. It really helps dril in the fundamentals with fun exercises and tests. I liked it.

I took dilligent notes during reading the book something i think helped as well. This along with the chapter tests and excercises were really beneficial. I would hazard to say that if i had used this book alone minus the PMBO I probably would have passed the exam as well.

Great book, easy to understand, and made the material engaging and fun.

#70 Setareh

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 12:34 AM

Dear All,

I am a chemical engineer who does not have any experiences in this filed and just worked as sales engineer,I want to know is that worth to get PMP as I want to make my resume more valuable.

#71 PMPnut

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 02:06 PM

Lessons Learned – Passed the PMP on first attempt with limited PM experience

I just passed the PMP exam on my first attempt. As part of my preparation, I used Rita Mulcahy’s book, which (I felt) discouraged those without significant experience managing large projects from going for the PMP. I work in an industry that is lacking in good project management processes (which is why I wanted the PMP to influence positive change in my field), so I have almost no professional experience in certain elements of project management (e.g. procurement, quality assurance, integrated change control). Throughout Rita’s book there are comments implying that without this professional experience, you will not pass the PMP exam. I found this very discouraging, but luckily, Rita’s comments did not influence the outcome of my exam and I was very happy with my PMP results:
Initiating: Proficient
Planning: Proficient
Executing: Proficient
Monitoring & Controlling: Proficient
Closing: Moderately Proficient

Despite the fact that there are thousands of “Lessons Learned” statements out there already, I am writing this Lessons Learned to help those in a similar situation (limited professional experience in good project management and limited study time) to pass the PMP.

Here is what I did in preparation for taking the PMP exam:

1. Completed a Diploma in Project Management at a local Business School = 40 hours of class over 3.5 months. I completed the course 3 months prior to taking the PMP exam. While the course did not teach specifically for the PMP exam, the final exam was similar to PMP. I scored 76% on the final exam in my Diploma so I felt I had a sufficient knowledge base to take the PMP exam 3 months later.

2. Started studying for the PMP exam 4 weeks prior to taking the test, logging approximately 60 hours of study in that time. The tools I used were:

• Head First PMP: I loved this book and read it 3 times in 4 months. This book is the opposite of Rita’s – It makes you feel like anyone could pass the PMP if they read this book. I don’t memorize or test well (particularly in multiple choice exams), so I really credit my success to Head First because it uses lots of strategies to help you learn things without rote memorization. That being said, it is a BIG book and not ideal for review. Once I had read the book a few times, I needed other tools for review. I scored 84% on the PMP sample exam at the back of the Head First book and felt they were a good preparation for the real exam.

• Rita Mulcahy’s Book: Since I found the text quite discouraging (as others also mention), I gave up reading it word-for-word and just looked at the test tips in each chapter (which are good). I also did all the questions at the end of each section. Despite success with the Head First PMP questions, I found Rita questions very confusing and long and scored poorly (65-85%) on the end-of-chapter questions. Luckily, I found the PMP exam questions were much clearer/more straight-forward that Rita’s.

• PMBOK (minimally) – Unlike most people, I did not read PMBOK cover to cover. I tried, but I just couldn’t stay focused because I found it too dry. I only used PMBOK to review the ITTOs (the diagrams are nice); to review the PMBOK Glossary to make sure I was familiar with the PMBOK definition of all terms; and to learn the project documents list on p350. I highly recommend looking through the PMBOK glossary at least to make sure all the terms are familiar to you.

• ITTO Flash cards: I made my own as I went through the Head First book. This helped me to summarize the book content. I have since discovered many app-based flash cards covering ITTOs / PMP prep. I wish I had discovered them earlier as they would have been very handy to study on buses/trains. As much as I hate memorizing, I would recommend learning ITTOs as much as possible as it gives you confidence going into the exam. I didn’t “memorize” per se, but I did go over and over the ITTOs (particularly inputs and outputs) as much as possible for the last 2 weeks of my preparation. I did not worry too much about which tools were used in which process – I just focused on knowing what the tools actually did so then it was easy to know which processes they would work for.

• Web-based games: PMPTrend has a good game for sorting processes and activities into the 5 process groups (see Rita’s Process game). I also found an ITTO game on the web which was helpful.

• Online Sample Exams: I once read that you know you’re ready for the exam when you start realizing that there are lots of “bad” sample exams (poorly worded questions and/or incorrect answers from authors). Most of the free web-based sample exams I found were “bad”. Only Head First’s online exam was good, but the questions were repetitive from the textbook exam I had already done. The night before my exam, I read good things about the Q&A’s book available on PMI.org. I wish I’d known about that and purchased it earlier because it looked the most relevant but it was too late for me to order.

• Online support: Once I identified the topics I found particularly challenging (e.g. Risk, Quality, Procurement), I found loads of good sources online that provided a variety of great explanations to these tricky concepts. Deep Fried Brain (http://www.deepfried...s-pmp-capm.html) and PMPTrend.com forums were especially helpful.

3. Talked to “My Husband, PMP”: I am lucky that my husband got his PMP ten years ago. This meant I had someone to talk to over the tricky questions. I found that when I TALKED about something, I remembered it much better than when I just read something. For this reason, I wish I’d joined a study group and would recommend that if you don’t have a PMP-Partner, you do find a study group or actively use an online forum to help put PM processes into long-term memory.

Here is what I did on exam-day:

1. Reviewed my ITTO flash cards on the way to the exam

2. Had a good lunch before the exam – The PMP exam is an endurance test (not unlike a marathon) so you need to stay nourished.

3. Wrote down equations (based on Rita’s equation list), and order of processes (using pneumatics) before I started the test. The tutorial only took 5minutes to walk through, so I used the remaining 10min of tutorial time to write this information down on the scratch paper provided. I did not use any of this information during the exam, but it was good for my confidence and it did not take any time away from the exam, so it was not time wasted.

4. Took a quick “first pass” through the test and generously “marked” all questions I was not 100% sure of – I answered all 200 questions as fast as possible (2hr 20min) so that I could feel a little more relaxed knowing at least all the questions had an answer if I ran out of time. I felt 75 of the questions were “easy”/straight-forward, but I “marked” 115 of the questions where I felt the answer was not 100% obvious. Once I’d finished the first pass, I went back and checked all the marked questions carefully. I ended up changing 8 answers (realising I had not read the question carefully enough or mad a math error). Of the 200 questions, there were 26 that I felt were very challenging and really “stumped” me – 6 of those were due to confusing wording, but the other 20 were due to the fact that I was unfamiliar with the concept/answers. Even though I had an hour and 40 minutes remaining to review 115 questions, by the time I was done reviewing, I only had 5 minutes left on the clock! I felt confident when I pressed “end exam” that with only 25 really difficult questions, I would pass the exam.

5. Took forced breaks and had snacks – I did this based on other lessons learned that I’d read. It was hard to tear myself away from the computer while the clock kept running, but I’m glad I did because 4 hours is a LONG time. I took a 5 min water and bathroom break after I’d answered 100 questions and again after I’d finished my first pass (when I also had a snack outside the exam room). I feel the break and snack gave me the energy I needed to review all the marked questions (which is much more taxing on the brain than the first pass).

That concludes my own PMP exam experience. I am so relieved I’ll never have to take the exam again! It is long and hard, but it is possible to pass if you give yourself time to prepare and are strategic in the tools you use. Read Head First, know your ITTOs, and use all the online support available and you’ll be a long way toward passing the PMP! Good luck!! And remember, if I can do it, so can you!!!

#72 RyanLS

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 11:21 AM

Great information. I think it is safe to say that no ones journey to obtaining his or her pmp certification is the same, but we can all learn from the similarities.

1. Develop a thorough preparation plan.
2. Set a timeline and benchmarks of achievements.
3. Pass the exam!

I also think it's worth it to take a exam prep course or develop a mock exam yourself.

#73 phamhong

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 08:57 PM

Many thanks
It is help me a lot.

Regards

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#74 RICKYBT

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 11:32 PM

I usually dont reply or comment on forums or blogs or the like, but I would like to say that I should thank this book for helping me pass my exam!! I passed the test on february 4th (2013). Honestly, I studied only 2 weeks!!! dont get me wrong, it was a hard test, but it is possible to achieve it in a short period of time. I studied 3 weekends (saturday and sundays from 11am to 6pm) and weekdays 4 hrs every day (1 hr before starting to work, 1 hr during lunch time, and 2 hrs before going to bed).

You should study this book along with the PMBook for cross reference, especially if you want to see the full list of inputs, tools and outputs (as sometimes in Head First PMP they are grouped). I took 2 sample tests, the one offered online by Head First and also the one offered for free by www.pmstudy.com.

Trust me, if you can pass!!!! the secret is in doing the sample tests....trust me, 4 hrs of testing is quite tiredsome.

Hope my experience helps somebody else in the hurry to study.

#75 Edward Chungg

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 11:14 PM

Thanks a lot your all the invaluable lessons learned. I am half-way in my preparation for the PMP exam (PMBOK 5th edition). The lessons learnt helped me a lot. I am now focusing my energy on doing online exam simulators.
Do visit PMP Exam Lessons Learned website with 100+ Tips on PMI PMP Certification Training & Study by 100+ Recent PMPs at http://pmexamlessonslearned.com/pmp

#76 Kathleen StH

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 01:38 PM

I successfully completed my PMP exam on Friday. Though my PMP workshop with PMStar was excellent, the 5-month break (Oct-Apr) left a lot of gaps. HeadFirst provided an excellent review, I liked the format and the practice tests and they were more like the questions encountered in the exam, especially the math (EV, NPV). Thanks, HeadFirst!

#77 Kristen J

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 08:44 AM

I passed yesterday. I read through the PMBOK (very difficult read for me, too dry) and finished my PDUs for learning a year ago, and put off the test until literally the very last day I could after I was eligible. I work in a startup, have a family, and have very little free time. I only used the HeadFirst PMP 3rd edition to prepare. I would say over 4 weeks I probably studied 30-40 hours. I did not feel super confident and basically took the test because I felt like I had no choice/already paid for it/had no time left.

One thing to expect on the exam is that the questions are often worded in a very bizarre way. The HeadFirst questions are written by people who are pretty good writers. I felt the actual exam questions were randomly generated by some sort of AI. Some of them made absolutely no sense to me. Not many - maybe 4, but those 4 freaked me out quite a bit.

I met medium proficiency in all process areas except for planning, which I scored below proficient. I am not really sure how that happened because I felt super comfortable with the area and scored very high on the practice exams covering this area in the HeadFirst book.

All-in-all, I would never have passed if I did not use HeadFirst. It was the perfect prep book for people in my situation with memory styles like I have. I know I could have done better if I mixed it up and maybe used Rita's book (everyone does it seems, I never touched it) and committed more time. But I PASSED! Woohoo :)

#78 PM_Padawan

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 06:24 PM

Congrats! I have a few more weeks before my exam and taking a break from co-currently reading PMBOK and HeadFirst for the second time to go through some LL's. Wow, couldn't imagine going into the exam like that. Nicely done!

#79 Leyan

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 02:27 PM

Practice practice practice and get your hand on any pmp course that you can get your hands on.

 

Here is a list of Free PMP Mock Exams that you can use along with the other great sources the group suggested

 

Here is the list I have compiled so far.. If you know good resources please share

 



#80 Beingchinmay

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Posted 20 July 2015 - 04:54 AM

Venture Management Professional (PMP®) accreditation is a capability system regulated by the Project Management Institute (PMI). In the PC and data innovation (IT) businesses, the term venture administration alludes to a deliberate way to deal with programming improvement through characterized stages called start, arranging, executing, controlling and shutting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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